RSS

Strete’s Ahead

07 Jul

In many rural areas, a major “A” road may as well be a side lane leaning to a farm. The topography makes widening the routes virtually impossible. But the positive side, as far as I can make out, is that the challenging conditions put many people off driving along them. It can be the only explanation for the glorious beach in Strete being all but deserted. In many rural areas, a major “A” road may as well be a side lane leaning to a farm. The topography makes widening the routes virtually impossible. But the positive side, as far as I can make out, is that the challenging conditions put many people off driving along them. It can be the only explanation for the glorious beach in Strete being all but deserted.
20140706-204135-74495438.jpg

20140706-204135-74495438.jpg
Then again, there’s no shortage of choices when it comes to beaches here. South and West of Dartmouth, the stretch of Slapton Sands continues for around three miles. Yet even on a warm July afternoon it’s by no means overcrowded – or spoilt by commercialism. The lack of development may be down to planning controls, but the visitors who use these beaches seem thankful and respectful of the environment. Then again, there’s no shortage of choices when it comes to beaches here. South and West of Dartmouth, the stretch of Slapton Sands continues for around three miles. Yet even on a warm July afternoon it’s by no means overcrowded – or spoilt by commercialism. The lack of development may be down to planning controls, but the visitors who use these beaches seem thankful and respectful of the environment.
Dartmouth itself is as Dartmouth has always been – a busy haven for tourists seeking pleasure. Again, it takes an extra effort to get here, but today the town is packed with people admiring the river, and the views across to Kingswear. Dartmouth itself is as Dartmouth has always been – a busy haven for tourists seeking pleasure. Again, it takes an extra effort to get here, but today the town is packed with people admiring the river, and the views across to Kingswear.
image
From here, there’s a choice of a river cruise to Totnes, from where you can get a bus to Paignton, then travel in style back to Kingswear by steam train. But right now, my mind’s on food.
image
There are hundreds of places to get fish and chips around here, and the standard price (high season) seems to be £5.95. Which might seem a bit steep – but at Rockfish the portions are generous and the menu is simple. This outlet is a takeaway version of the “posh fish and chip” restaurants opened in recent times by chef Mitch Tonks. And the result is very tasty.
The huge trays of frozen fish being brought through by the staff suggests that it isn’t necessarily caught locally. But fishing is still a significant industry in Dartmouth, and just up the coast in Brixham.
image
Located at the far end of the English Riviera, Brixham still combines the dual role of holiday town and working port. Steep streets lead to the harbour, where seaside shops lure in the tourists. And some interesting looking pubs too.
image

20140706-205158-75118158.jpg
There’s also a thriving ferry trade in Brixham, transporting visitors across to Torquay for just £1. It’s a bargain price, offering views of Torbay and its collection of sailors, jet skiers and even a couple of mad people doing endurance swimming. Once ashore, and there’s a building from my past which brings great memories.
image
The top floor of Harbour Point used to house the Torquay studios of DevonAir, later Gemini Radio, where I worked for two years in the 1990s.
I was mainly based in Exeter, but occasionally had the treat of covering the South Devon shift. This largely consisted of recording a report in the morning and spending much of the rest of the day drinking coffee on the balcony. The studio had pretty much the best one of any radio station in the UK.
Of course, most people are here for pleasure rather than work. So, need a gift from Dartmouth?
image

Advertisements
 
 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: